Wusterhausen project

In 2006, during excavations in Wusterhausen, one of the 12th century graves, number 55, was determined to be a Northwest Slavic elite grave, containing a male corpse, a sword, and remnants of 4 types of brocaded bands. These bands are described in “Ein spätslawischer Friedhof mit Schwertgräbern von Wusterhausen an der Dosse” by Stephan Brather.

The state of the findings does not allow for a full reconstruction of the pattern, but what can be seen are a series of diagonal lines, creating probably a zigzag pattern, although some points on the photo on page 83 may suggest it was a more complicated pattern, either with some sort of diamond elements, basket weave or maybe even zoomorphic elements, like on the brocaded band from the chasuble attributed to St. Wolfgang at St. Emmeram’s in Regensburg.

Three of the 4 bands were located on the man’s wrists and upper arms:

The forth bands was too damaged to be sure.

Considering the publication and after comparisons with other findings from this period and geographical location, I chose the following patterns for the reconstruction:

Band 1 – fragment of pattern with basket weave motive, from the chasuble of Bernhard I, Bishop of Hildesheim, 12th century. Based on the information from N. Spies “Ecclesiastical Pomp & Aristocratic Circumstance”, 2000, page 139.

Band 2 – fragment of pattern with “plain weave” motive, from the tomb of “Bishop V”, Speyer, 12th century. Based on the information from N. Spies “Ecclesiastical Pomp & Aristocratic Circumstance”, 2000, page 146.

Band 3 – attempted reconstruction of the Wusterhausen pattern, simplified to a zigzag.

Band 1 based on Hildesheim
Band 2 based on Speyer
Band 3 based on Wusterhausen

To order custom made brocaded bands like these, please visit my shop.

Reference:

  1. Nancy Spies, “Ecclesiastical Pomp & Aristocratic Circumstance”, 2000
  2. Stephan Brather, “Die Goldborten aus Grab Bef. 55” [in:] Felix Biermann und Franz Schopper (Hrsg.), “Ein spätslawischer Friedhof mit Schwertgräbern von Wusterhausen an der Dosse”, page 78-85

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